Minorities in cartoons: Oliver Wendell Jones

Oliver Wendell Jones

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Oliver Wendell Jones, a character introduced in 1983 in Berkeley Breathed’s popular comic strip “Bloom County.” Similar to “FoxTrot”‘s Jason Fox, and unlike fellow African-American costar Ronald-Ann Smith, Oliver spent much of his time engaged in geeky or scientific pursuits. This was to the dismay of his parents, … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Firestorm (Jason Rusch)

Firestorm

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Jason Rusch, a DC Comics character who’s the superhero Firestorm. Jason first appeared in “Firestorm” (vol. 3) #1 (July 2004), and was created by writer Dan Jolley and artist Chris Cross. Jason’s backstory states he was a 17-year-old who grew up in Detroit and had a rough background. … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: “Transformers: Rescue Bots”

Rescue Bots

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is the TV series “Transformers: Rescue Bots.” The show debuted on The Hub (now Discovery Family) in 2011, and has run for three seasons (totalling 64 episodes). The show’s pitched at younger viewers, and as such isn’t as violent as the usual “Transformers” entries. The premise of the series … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Natasha Irons

Natasha Irons

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Natasha Irons, a DC Comics character. Natasha first appeared in “Steel” #1 in February 1994. She was created by writers Louise Simonson and Jon Bogdanove, and artist Chris Batista. Natasha’s the niece of John Henry Irons, also known as the superhero Steel. Natasha’s shown as being quite intelligent; she’s introduced as … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Frozone

Frozone

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Frozone, a character from the 2004 Pixar movie “The Incredibles.” Frozone (real name: Lucius Best) is a superhero with ice-themed powers, similar to those of his corporate cousins Elsa (of Disney’s “Frozen”) or Iceman (of Marvel’s X-Men). As such, Frozone used his abilities to fight crime, until a … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Jackie Ormes

Jackie Ormes

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Jackie Ormes. Ormes has the distinction of being the first African-American woman to become a syndicated cartoonist. Born in the Pittsburgh area in 1911, Ormes eventually went to work for the weekly African-American newspaper, the “Pittsburgh Courier.” There, she drew her first comic strip, “Torchy Brown in Dixie to Harlem.” … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Toni Topaz

Toni Topaz

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Toni Topaz, a supporting character in Archie Comics. Toni‘s first appearance was in “Jughead Double Digest” #176 (February 2012). Toni was created by Tom DeFalco and Ron Frenz. Toni’s an African-American girl whose signature look is her pink hair and preference for purple clothing. Her initial appearance states she … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Trev Smith

Trev Smith

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Trev Smith of Archie Comics. Trev (short for “Trevor”) first appeared in “Archie” #631 (May 2012) and was created by artist/writer Dan Parent. Trev was introduced as the younger brother of Valerie of “Josie and the Pussycats” fame. (The introductory story seems to establish the Pussycats as being post-high schoolers/college aged, … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: “Girls With Slingshots”

Girls With Slingshots

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is “Girls With Slingshots,” a webcomic that’s been running since 2004. “Girls” is created by Danielle Corsetto, and runs on weekdays. The strip revolves around its two main characters, Jamie McJack (pictured above, left) and Hazel Tellington (pictured above, right), two friends who deal with various slice-of-life situations, including … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: “Tutenstein”

Tutenstein

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is “Tutenstein,” a cartoon that ran on the Discovery Kids cable channel (now Discovery Family, by way of The Hub) from 2003 to 2008. The series’ premise is centered around its eponymous star, whose real name is “Tutankhensetamun,” a play on the name of real-life Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen (the famous “King … Read more