Minorities in cartoons: Frozone

Frozone

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Frozone, a character from the 2004 Pixar movie “The Incredibles.” Frozone (real name: Lucius Best) is a superhero with ice-themed powers, similar to those of his corporate cousins Elsa (of Disney’s “Frozen”) or Iceman (of Marvel’s X-Men). As such, Frozone used his abilities to fight crime, until a … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Jackie Ormes

Jackie Ormes

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Jackie Ormes. Ormes has the distinction of being the first African-American woman to become a syndicated cartoonist. Born in the Pittsburgh area in 1911, Ormes eventually went to work for the weekly African-American newspaper, the “Pittsburgh Courier.” There, she drew her first comic strip, “Torchy Brown in Dixie to Harlem.” … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Fire (DC Comics)

Fire and Ice

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Fire (real name: Beatriz Bonilla da Costa), a Brazilian superheroine published by DC Comics. Fire first appeared in “Super Friends” #25 (October 1979), and was created by E. Nelson Bridwell and Ramona Fradon. Beatriz first appeared in the “Super Friends” comics as the “Green Fury,” a heroine with … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Tasmanian Devil (DC Comics)

Tasmanian Devil

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Tasmanian Devil (real name Hugh Dawkins), a DC Comics superhero and member of the team the Global Guardians. Tasmanian Devil first appeared in “Super Friends” #7 (October 1977), and was created by E. Nelson Bridwell and Ramona Fradon. Dawkins’ backstory doesn’t give the origin of his powers (besides … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Owlwoman

Owlwoman

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Owlwoman, a DC Comics superheroine (real name: Wenonah Littlebird). Owlwoman first appeared in “Super Friends” #7 (August 1977), and was created by E. Nelson Bridwell and Ramona Fradon. Wenonah’s backstory is that she’s a Native American from Oklahoma, and is the only American member of the global superhero … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Seraph

Seraph

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Seraph (real name: Chaim Levon), a superhero in DC Comics. Seraph first appeared in “Super Friends” #7 (October 1977), and was created by E. Nelson Bridwell and Ramona Fradon. Seraph was created for the “Super Friends” tie-in comic in the late 70s as part of an effort to add … Read more

The top 10 minorities in cartoons entries for 2014, plus the winners of the favorite entry poll

Based on Google Analytics traffic, here’s the 10 most popular minorities in cartoons entries for 2014. Charles Xavier (“X-Men”) Russell (“Up”) “Wild Kratts” Alysia Yeoh (“Batgirl”) White Tiger (Marvel) Thomas Kalmaku (“Green Lantern”) Kamala Khan (“Ms. Marvel”) Chloe (“Sabrina the Teenage Witch”) Trixie Tang (“The Fairly OddParents”) Franklin (“Peanuts”) The most popular entry by traffic’s … Read more

2014 in review poll: vote for your favorite minorities in cartoons!

2014

We’ve reached the end of another year, and with it, I thought I’d give creating another poll a go, as well as take the holidays off from writing minorities in cartoons posts. Thus, here’s the poll: vote for your favorite character(s)/show(s) I’ve written a “minorities in cartoons” post about in 2014. Feel free to vote for … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Toni Topaz

Toni Topaz

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Toni Topaz, a supporting character in Archie Comics. Toni‘s first appearance was in “Jughead Double Digest” #176 (February 2012). Toni was created by Tom DeFalco and Ron Frenz. Toni’s an African-American girl whose signature look is her pink hair and preference for purple clothing. Her initial appearance states she … Read more

Minorities in cartoons: Trev Smith

Trev Smith

This week’s minorities in cartoons entry is Trev Smith of Archie Comics. Trev (short for “Trevor”) first appeared in “Archie” #631 (May 2012) and was created by artist/writer Dan Parent. Trev was introduced as the younger brother of Valerie of “Josie and the Pussycats” fame. (The introductory story seems to establish the Pussycats as being post-high schoolers/college aged, … Read more