Mar 042013
 

TweetDeckTwitter, owners (since 2011) of the long-standing TweetDeck Twitter client software, has announced it’s shutting down the iOS, Android, and Adobe AIR versions of its client. The mass purge in support platforms is being done so TweetDeck can shift to primarily being a web-based (and Chrome-browser-based) service, though the Mac and Windows clients will continue to be supported (for now…). However, the remaining future versions will no longer have Facebook integration.

Coupled with the recent heavy cutback in support for non-Twitter-approved software tying into Twitter, it all feels rather provincial for such a hugely popular online service. As for the future of web-based TweetDeck, one of its few remaining competitors will probably be HootSuite.

On my Android devices, I switched some time ago to using Twitter’s main app, as it supports in-line photo and conversation thread displaying much better than TweetDeck did. On my Mac Mini, I use the TweetDeck app. As for my Linux Mint laptop, I use Twitter’s website, bookmarked as a pinned tab in Firefox and Chromium.

May 272012
 

TweetDeckLately, the app I’ve been using for posting to Twitter from my smartphone is TweetDeck. TweetDeck was originally developed as an independent app, before being bought last year by Twitter. I started using TweetDeck after wanting an alternative to Seesmic.

TweetDeck offers basic functions for using both Twitter and Facebook. For the former, one can retweet tweets, mark various tweets as “favorites,” and upload photos taken (with a choice of photo hosts, YFrog or TwitPic). For the Facebook side, one can mark posts as favorites, respond to posts, and share posts.

TweetDeck also displays the above in separate swipable “columns” (swipe the screen left or right to move to the next service), along with (by default) columns for one’s own direct messages (in Twitter) and responses to one’s posts. Columns may be added or deleted (say, a column for displaying results for specific search terms).

TweetDeck works reasonably well, though on my smartphone (admittedly a low-end model LG Optimus model), deleting text when editing a message feels sluggish. Another flaw is the Facebook function doesn’t indicate whether one’s own posts (viewed in the feed listings) have any responses, unless directly read. There’s also the lack of making available pre-bookmarked search terms from Twitter itself.

No ads are displayed in TweetDeck, presumably as a result of being directly owned by Twitter, versus Seesmic’s recent changes (the free version now features ads).

For an alternative to TweetDeck, Seesmic also works well.